Methods of Teaching in Institutions of Higher Learning Teacher Centred Vs. Learner Centred Methods UGC NET

Methods of Teaching in Institutions of Higher Learning Teacher Centred Vs. Learner Centred Methods UGC NET

Edmund Amidon (1967) states,

“Teaching is an interactive process, primarily involving classroom talk which takes place between teacher and pupil and occurs during certain definable activities”.

John Brubacher (1939) adds,

“Teaching is the arrangement and manipulation of a situation in which there are gaps or obstructions which an individual will seek to overcome and from which he will learn in the course of doing so.”

According to Morrison,

“Teaching is intimate contact between a more mature personality and a less mature one which is designed to further the education of the latter.”

There are four basic requirements of teaching which are as follows:

1. Teacher

2. Student

3. Subject

4. Environment

Teacher centred methods emphasise on the teacher who is the primary source of knowledge and information. In a teacher centred method, the teacher offers lectures, information, and also assigns tasks or projects to students for completing and assessing their knowledge. The teacher leads the learning process and controls the pace and content of the course. The main emphasis is on transmitting knowledge to students, with limited student interaction or collaboration. 

Learner centred teaching methods, on the other hand, emphasises on the needs and interests of the student in the learning process. The teacher serves as a facilitator, guiding and supporting students in their learning journey in this method. Learner-centred methods encourage active student participation, collaboration, and critical thinking. The main emphasis is on developing the student’s skills and abilities, enabling them to construct their own knowledge, for its application in real-world situations.

Teachers must, “have a deep knowledge of the subject that they teach and can communicate content effectively to their students.” Teachers must motivate the learners to succeed and retain their interest in the lessons being taught. “A good teaching climate challenges students, develops a sense of competence, attributes success to effort rather than ability, and values resilience to failure.”

According to Morrison,

“Teaching is intimate contact between a more mature personality and a less mature one which is designed to further the education of the latter.”